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This Week in farm to school: 7/26/16

NFSN Staff Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 



Grants & Funding
1. INUAg 2016 Leaders in Urban Agriculture Awards 
INUAg is now accepting submissions for the 2016 Leaders in Urban Agriculture Awards. They will present awards for 1st ($1,000) 2nd ($700) and 3rd place ($300) in each of the following categories to urban farming projects building better food systems around the world: Educating Communities, Food Justice, Innovation. Submissions are due August 15. Learn more here


Webinars & Events
1. Webinar: Explore the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census 
August 11, 3pm ET
Join the National Farm to School Network and USDA FNS Office of Community Food Systems on Thursday, August 11 at 3pm ET for an in-depth review of the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census. Presenters will provide an overview of the Farm to School Census website, including the recently posted raw data files and soon to be released data explorer tool. Presenters will also describe ways in which Census data can be used at the local, state, and national levels in support of farm to school. Register for the webinar here.

2. Registration Open: Southern Obesity Summit
November 13-15 // Houston, Texas
Registration for the 10th Annual Southern Obesity Summit is now open. The Southern Obesity Summit is the largest regional obesity prevention event in the United States, drawing hundreds of participants from 16 Southern States. The 10th Annual Southern Obesity Summit will help stakeholders strategize next steps to implement policy and program initiatives across all 16 states and effectively engage youth in our strategies to prevent obesity. Learn more and register here

3. NESAWG It Takes a Region Conference
November 10-12 // Hartford, CT
Earlybird registration for NESAWG's 2016 It Takes a Region Conference opens August 1. The Conference, now in its 23rd year, brings together practitioners and professionals from across the Northeast to explore ideas that move us towards a more sustainable and just farm and food system. This year's conference theme is Tackling Wicked Problems in Food Systems. NESAWG has printed 1,500 conference postcards and needs your help to get them to the right people. If you can help distribute the postcards, email Julia Fiore (julia@nesawg.com). Learn more about the conference here


Research & Resources
1. USDA Announces 4 Major School Meals Rules 
Last week, USDA announced four final rules that will ensure that children have access to healthy snacks and that nutrition standards for the foods marketed and served in schools are consistent. The rules include: Local School Wellness Policy final rule; Smart Snacks in School final rule; Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) final rule; and, Administrative Review final rule. Learn more here


Jobs & Opportunities
1. Research Fellow, School Food Focus
School Food Focus seeks a part-time Research Fellow to join its PreK-12 School Food: Making It Healthier, Making It Regional (MHMR) study. MHMR is a two-year project, conducted by School Food Focus in conjunction with Rutgers University, to study the impact of shifting public school food procurement to more healthful and/or more regional foods. The Research Fellow will contribute to all aspects of the study, particularly data collection, data analysis, and writing of final reports. Applications are due August 5. Learn more and apply here


Farm to school in the news
Salem serves up summer meals
The Salem Summer Meals Program (Salem, Mass.) provides free breakfast and lunch to children while school is out. Among meals served are fresh salads harvested from Salem High School’s Freight Farm, a sustainable garden built into a refurbished freight car, located in Salem High School’s parking lot. (via Salem Gazette

Lake Geneva school grows food for lunch program
"When I got involved with these agriculture classes, I made a whole group of new friends that are now like my family. I love the agricultural aspect, and I've found there are ways that someone who doesn't live on a farm can still raise food,” says Bryn Rohde, Badger High School student. (via Wisconsin State Farmer)

Teachers learn about planting school gardens

About 40 teachers from across Virginia have taken part in a two-day workshop to learn about a more hands-on approach to education. The teachers are learning how to start and maintain gardens, and how to connect school gardens to school cafeterias. (via WHSV

Read past editions of This Week  for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country. 

This Week in farm to school: 7/19/16

NFSN Staff Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 



Grants & Funding
1. INUAg 2016 Leaders in Urban Agriculture Awards 
INUAg is now accepting submissions for the 2016 Leaders in Urban Agriculture Awards. They will present awards for 1st ($1,000) 2nd ($700) and 3rd place ($300) in each of the following categories to urban farming projects building better food systems around the world: Educating Communities, Food Justice, Innovation. Submissions are due August 15. Learn more here


Webinars & Events
1. Webinar: Explore the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census 
August 11, 3pm ET
Join the National Farm to School Network and USDA FNS Office of Community Food Systems on Thursday, August 11 at 3pm ET for an in-depth review of the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census. Presenters will provide an overview of the Farm to School Census website, including the recently posted raw data files and soon to be released data explorer tool. Presenters will also describe ways in which Census data can be used at the local, state, and national levels in support of farm to school. Register for the webinar here.


Research & Resources
1. Full Report: Results from a National Survey of Early Care and Education Providers
Earlier this year, the National Farm to School Network launched the preliminary results of our 2015 survey of early care and education providers. With nearly 1,500 providers in 49 state and Washington, D.C., responding, we learned that farm to school in early care and education is promoting healthy eating habits and providing high quality learning environments for thousands of children at a critical stage of development. A full report of the survey results is now available for download. Looking for a quick overview of the highlights? Check out our infographic and one-page fact sheet

2. Keynote Videos Available from 8th National Farm to Cafeteria Conference 
In June, more than 1,000 farm to cafeteria leaders gathered in Madison, Wis., for three days of learning, networking and idea sharing at the 8th National Farm to Cafeteria Conference. Among the highlights were keynote addresses given by some of the most instrumental leaders driving the farm to cafeteria movement forward. Recordings of the keynote addresses are now available on YouTube. Watch them here


Jobs & Opportunities
1. Program Director, Chef Ann Foundation
The Chef Anna Foundation seeks a Program Director to joins its team. This full time position will be responsible for all work as it relates to the development, implementation and management of Chef Ann Foundation’s online learning program in addition to other program oversight. Learn more and apply here

2. Executive Director, Green Mountain Farm to School

Green Mountain Farm to School seeks an Executive Director to join its team. The Executive Director will lead GMFTS by managing the finances, staff, programs, and structure required to enact GMFTS’s mission. Learn more and apply here

3. Event & Project Coordinator, Farm to Institution New England

The FINE Event and Project Coordinator will play a lead role in coordinating the 2017 Farm to Institution Summit in April 2017, working in close contact with the Summit Steering Committee and FINE staff. The Coordinator will also support event planning for other events that FINE conducts and provide coordination functions for other FINE projects including the Processing Community of Practice and Harvest of the Month Community of Practice. Learn more and apply here


Farm to school in the news
Schools use ag to educate students about food system - shout out to Lorin Fahrmeier, NFSN Missouri State Lead!
Farm to school efforts in Missouri support rural economies, put more nutritious foods into the school system and educate students about their food and where it comes from. School gardens, farm field trips and local food procurement are taking off. (via Missouri Farmer Today)

Leaders of Color Discuss Structural Racism and White Privilege in the Food System
What can the food movement learn from Black Lives Matter? Civil Eats reached out to leaders of color in the food justice community for their thoughts about how they think the “food movement” might come together on the issues of race, equity, and access. (via Civil Eats)

University works to bring local food to dining halls
The executive chef of Southern Illinois University has for years been in the forefront of a program aimed at increasing food purchased from small-acreage farmers in the region. An Illinois mandate requires that by 2020, state-funded institutions such as universities and prisons purchase at least 20 percent of meat and produce from farms within a 250-mile radius. (via Illinois Farmer Today)

Read past editions of This Week  for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country. 

Take Action: Paper Plate Advocacy

NFSN Staff Friday, July 15, 2016

Congress only has a few weeks left to pass the Child Nutrition Reauthorization (CNR) this year, so we’re organizing a paper plate campaign to share with legislators the many reasons that healthy school meals and farm to school are vital for a healthier next generation.
 
At the 8th National Farm to Cafeteria Conference last month, more than 350 people joined us in writing and drawing on paper plates what school meals and farm to school mean to their communities. Here’s a snapshot of what people said: 

Kids are what they eat and will eat what they grow. Let them grow healthy!

School meals may be the best meal of the day! Make it good, make it great. Tasty, healthy food for ALL.

Helping schools source local produce improves freshness and quality and builds and supports the local economy.

School meals fuel healthy bodies & strong minds!

In the next few weeks, we’ll be delivering these plates to lawmakers as they continue to debate this important piece of legislation. 
 
There’s still time to participate in our paper plate campaign! Share your farm to school message on a paper plate (add your name, city and zipcode to the back) and send it to our office in Washington, D.C. We’ll hand deliver your plate to Congress and send a strong message to legislators that school meals and farm to school are an important part of growing healthy kids. As a reminder, this activity is not lobbying so anyone can participate!
 
Mail paper plates to:
National Farm to School Network
110 Maryland Avenue NE, Suite 209 
Washington, D.C. 20002
 
Sign up for our newsletter and follow us on social media to stay up-to-date on the latest CNR news. 

Putting data to work

NFSN Staff Thursday, July 14, 2016
Messaging and advocacy with results from the NFSN Farm to Early Care and Education Survey and USDA Farm to School Census 



By Lacy Stephens, MS, RDN, Farm to Early Care and Education Associate

With abundant information from the National Farm to School Network 2015 National Survey of Early Care and Education Providers and the preK data from the USDA Farm to School Census, we have a better understanding than ever of the current reach of farm to early care and education. 

According to the National Farm to School Network (NFSN) survey, 54 percent of respondents are currently engaging in farm to early care and education (farm to ECE) activities, and the USDA census shows that 32 percent of responding school districts participate in these activities with preschool students. This information not only provides a picture of the current status of farm to early care and education, but can be a valuable tool to spread and scale the movement. NFSN’s survey infographic, fact sheet and full report and USDA’s website and data sets can be used to spark programmatic and policy change at multiple levels and engage all stakeholders in understanding the value of local food procurement, gardening and food and farm education.   

NFSN survey responses will resonate with early care and education providers – the survey’s respondents – who indicate that two of the top reasons for engaging in farm to ECE activities include improving children’s health and providing experiential learning opportunities. These reasons parallel goals in the early care and education community and underscore the opportunity for farm to ECE to create a high quality environment for young children. The survey also demonstrates the wide array of activities encompassed by farm to ECE, including the top three reported activities: teaching children about local food and how it grows, gardening and using local food in meals and snacks. 



State level stakeholders, such as state agencies housing the Child and Adult Care Food Program, those housing early childhood programs and early care and education professional or advocacy organizations, will find appealing the ability to use farm to ECE to meet health and early learning objectives and should note the wide spread interest in growing farm to ECE: in addition to the 54 percent of respondents already engaged, an additional 28 percent plan to start activities in the future. Further, the specific information regarding purchasing practices can help frame and tailor training opportunities. State level stakeholders may be interested to see that farm to ECE activities are being applied in all types of early care and education settings, so regardless of the type of program they work with, these opportunities abound.      

Local, state, and federal policy makers are important stakeholders to reach with data. The infographic and fact sheet developed from the NFSN survey are valuable tools to start these conversations as they not only outline the challenges in early childhood, including obesity, food insecurity and poor quality care and education, but also the opportunity to reach a large number of children and families through early care and education settings. The value of farm to ECE in addressing these problems is reflected in the motivations reported by respondents, including improving children’s health, experiential learning and increasing access to fresh, high quality food. 

Conveying the potential economic impacts is also important in communicating with policy makers. According to the NFSN survey, reporting respondents spent 27 percent of their food budget on local food and 74 percent of those purchasing locally plan to increase their purchases in the future – a huge potential boon to farmers and producers and local economies. Results also identify barriers to local purchasing, including cost and seasonality of food and unreliable supply. Understanding barriers can spur conversation about policies that may alleviate these issues, including increased funding, offering provider trainings and supporting local food supply chain infrastructure. USDA census data allows you to make your message local. Seeing how your state or school district compares to others in applying farm to school in preschool can be a great motivator to take action and catch up with other states or districts.

To spread and scale farm to early care and education and ensure that more children, families, and communities benefit from these valuable activities, we must reach stakeholders and garner support at every level. Equipped with data, resources and passion, farm to early care and education champions are furthering the movement everyday by advocating for programmatic and policy changes that not only directly support farm to early care and education, but create high quality learning environments and improved community food systems. 

For additional resources and ways to get involved by visiting our farm to early care and education and farm to school policy webpages. 

This Week in farm to school: 7/12/16

NFSN Staff Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 



Webinars & Events
1. Webinar: Explore the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census 
August 11, 3pm ET
Join the National Farm to School Network and USDA FNS Office of Community Food Systems on Thursday, August 11 at 3pm ET for an in-depth review of the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census. Presenters will provide an overview of the Farm to School Census website, including the recently posted raw data files and soon to be released data explorer tool. Presenters will also describe ways in which Census data can be used at the local, state, and national levels in support of farm to school. Register for the webinar here.

2. Webinar: State Food Policy Council Call
July 25, 2:30-4pm EDT
You’re invited to an initial virtual convening of statewide food policy councils to talk about what is happening in states to network local food policy councils and/or change policy. If you are the manager, director, chairperson, coordinator or leader of a statewide food policy council that works on food and farm policies at the state level and/or you convene a network of local food policy councils from across the state, we want you to join us. The call is being coordinated jointly by the John Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Community Food Strategies, a project led by the Center for Environmental Farming Systems, and Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems. Register here

3. Last Call for Submissions: Fourth Annual Yale Food Systems Symposium
September 30, New Haven, CT
The Fourth Annual Yale Food Systems Symposium planning committee is now accepting submissions to present at this year's event, to be held September 30, 2016 at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies in New Haven, CT. This year's theme surrounds the topic of "Feeding a Growing World: Perspectives in 2016." Please see their website for the full RFP and for the online form to submit proposals. Submissions are due July 15. 


Research & Resources
1. Report: School District Wellness Policies
The Bridging the Gap/National Wellness Policy Study District Wellness Policy Monograph has been released, which covers the first eight years of the wellness policy requirement for school years 2006-07 through 2013-14. Using a nationally representative sample of school districts, this report provides details about the characteristics of these districts as well as the individual components of wellness policies and related provisions. View the report here


Jobs & Opportunities
1. Executive Director of Food and Child Nutrition Services, Cleveland Metropolitan School District
CMSD seeks a full-time Executive Director of Food and Child Nutrition Services. Under the direction of the Chief Operating Officer, the Executive Director of Food and Child Nutrition Services will oversee all aspects of the district’s Child Nutrition Program operation. Learn more and apply here

2. Agriculture Development Coordinator, Vermont Agency of Agriculture
This Agriculture Development Coordinator temporary position will have project management responsibilities associated with the Vermont Farm to School (FTS) grant program, engagement in broader farm to institution project efforts, and extensive relationship building and communication with statewide food system stakeholders and partners. Learn more here


Farm to school in the news
Lessons sprout from soil, water, hard work - shout out to Elaine McDonnell, NFSN Pennsylvania State Lead!
More than 133 school gardens are growing across Pennsylvania, such as the small farm at Bucks County's Bristol Middle-High School. In four years, the garden has grown from 21 raised beds, an herb wall, a pond, arbors, tree-shaded picnic benches, and a new vermiculture system in which worms turn food waste into nutrient-rich compost. (via The Philadelphia Inquirer)

Growing together: Gardening offers key lessons for children
The Toledo Botanical Garden, in conjunction with Toledo GROWS, has 19 school gardens. Last year, more than 7,000 kids engaged with the earth through field trips, camps, and in-class programs that the garden has been offering for more than 40 years. (via Toledo Blade)

Edible gardens growing more popular in schools, communities
Connecticut students within a growing number of public schools are doing hands-on work with edible gardens. “Edible schoolyards are an effective way to engage families in students’ learning. Getting families interested in school gardens helps entire communities benefit from sustainable gardening and benefits the environment in the long run.” (via Journal Inquirer)

Read past editions of This Week  for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country. 

Four ways to use social enterprise to sustain your school garden

NFSN Staff Thursday, July 07, 2016
By Courtney Leeds, Schoolyard Farms

This blog was adapted from a Lightning Talk presented by Schoolyard Farms Co-Founder and Director Courtney Leeds at the 8th National Farm to Cafeteria Conference on June 3, 2016, in Madison, Wis. The 2016 conference brought together more than 1,000 diverse stakeholders working to advance a more healthy, just and sustainable food system for all. 



School gardens offer countless benefits: they encourage children to eat more fruits and vegetables; teach science, math and history; and increase positive attitudes toward schools and communities. Yet, despite the known benefits, many school gardens struggle to secure funding for supplies, maintenance and garden educators. While there are grant opportunities that help kick start school gardens by providing initial funding for tools and infrastructure, how can programs continue to sustain themselves? One solution could be incorporating social enterprise into your school garden activities. 

At Schoolyard Farms in Portland, Ore., we have tested several enterprise models to see which options best fit the schools and communities we work with. Here are a few ideas you can use to help your garden thrive: 

Plant Sales
Generate funding and bring the community together with a plant sale. Have each class at your school start a different type of plant in early spring, or ask a local nursery to donate their older inventory. Pick a date and plan an event to sell the seedlings and bring the community to your garden. This could be a garden celebration, a potluck, or simply an opportunity for guests to wander the garden. Invite everyone – the school community, local businesses, community groups and neighbors. Recruit students to help staff the plant sale table, where they’ll have the opportunity to learn important entrepreneurial and money skills. 



Save Seeds
Saving seed from the garden is an amazingly effective way to teach hands-on lessons about life-cycles, recycling and stewardship. It’s also a great opportunity to create products that can be sold throughout the year to support your school garden. Let some of the plants in your garden go to seed and teach students to harvest them. Save some of the seeds to be replanted in your garden next year, and reserve the others to sell. Seeds are a great product because they are nonperishable and generally remain viable for three years. Easy seeds to start with are beans, which are large, beautiful and easy for children to thresh. Another simple option is cilantro: it goes to seed quickly, produces large seeds, and can be used as either cilantro seed or coriander spice. Have students decorate small envelopes with pictures and planting information, package the seeds, and sell at school events or a local nursery. 

Community Supported Agriculture
If your school has a large garden, consider growing and selling excess produce to the community through a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. CSA is a model used by small farmers to sell their product directly to consumers, where consumers pay a fee to the farmer in the beginning of the season and, in exchange, receive weekly boxes of fresh produce from the farm. The CSA program at Schoolyard Farms generates approximately 30 percent of our income, with grants and donations making up the remainder of our revenue. Managing a CSA program can be time and labor intensive, but this model of selling fresh garden produce offers great benefits for both school and the community.   



Market Stands
If managing a weekly CSA program is not feasible, consider setting up a market stand to sell your garden’s produce. Market stands offer a great amount of flexibility – they can be set up once a week, once a month, or whatever interval best meets your needs. Whichever schedule you decide, try to stick to it so the community knows when your stand will be open. Unlike CSAs, market stands don’t require a set amount of produce each week. They provide the flexibility to sell whatever is available in the field at a given time. Market stands can easily be set up at your school or at local businesses, and provide a great opportunity for students to develop strong marketing and customer service skills. 


Schoolyard Farms is dedicated to creating healthier communities by teaching kids how to grow nutritious food that goes from their schoolyard to their plate. They do this by building mini-production farms on underused schoolyards that act as outdoor classrooms for schools. Learn more about Schoolyard Farms here

This Week in farm to school: 7/5/16

NFSN Staff Tuesday, July 05, 2016

Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 



Webinars & Events
1. Webinar: Explore the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census 
August 11, 3pm ET
Join the National Farm to School Network and USDA FNS Office of Community Food Systems on Thursday, August 11 at 3pm ET for an in-depth review of the 2015 USDA Farm to School Census. Presenters will provide an overview of the Farm to School Census website, including the recently posted raw data files and soon to be released data explorer tool. Presenters will also describe ways in which Census data can be used at the local, state, and national levels in support of farm to school. Register for the webinar here.


Research & Resources
1. A Complete History of the Social, Health, and Political Context of the School Gardening Movement in the United States: 1840–2014
Early 19th-century educators established school gardens with the same intent as today: to create a meaningful learning environment that connects students with food and nature. What has been more varied and less explored are the social, health, and political contexts behind the ebb and flow of support for school garden over the past 150 years, with this kind of exploration about the last few decades being particularly absent. This article demonstrates how school gardens are a mainstay in the United States as a result of their fluidity and unique ability to attach to important social, health, and political issues. Read the article here

2. Foods From the Islands: Changing the way we feed our kids
Farm to Cafeteria Canada, the Social Planning and Research Council of BC, and its partners with Nourishing School Communities and on Haida Gwaii are pleased to announce the release of a new video "Local Foods to School: Reconnecting the children of Haida Gwaii to their food and land.“ This 8 minute video illuminates what is possible when communities are supported with the resources they need to realize their vision to get healthy local foods on the minds and on the plates of student. Watch the video here.


Jobs & Opportunities
1. REAP Farm to School Team Members
REAP Food Group is currently seeking candidates to fill four AmeriCorps positions with the REAP Farm to School program. They are recruiting three Nutrition Educators and one Community Outreach member. Learn more and apply here

Read past editions of This Week  for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country. 

This Week in farm to school: 6/28/16

NFSN Staff Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 



Grants & Funding
1. Early Head Start Grants as Opportunity for Farm to ECE Funding
The Administration for Children and Families has announced approximately $135 million in funding available to expand access to high-quality, comprehensive services for low-income infants and toddlers and their families. This funding will support the creation of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships and the expansion of Early Head Start services to children and families. ACF solicits applications from public entities, including states, or private non-profit organizations, including community-based or faith-based organizations, or for-profit agencies that meet eligibility for applying as stated in section 645A of the Head Start Act. Explore available funding opportunities here


Webinars & Events
1. Webinar: Integrating Local Foods into Child Nutrition Programs
Thursday, June 30 // 3-4pm ET
Fruits and vegetables, milk and cheese, whole grain breads and pastas, beans, meats, seafood, and poultry - the opportunities for serving local foods in child nutrition programs are abundant! In the webinar Integrating Local Foods in Child Nutrition Programs, USDA’s Office of Community Food Systems will highlight the variety of ways districts across the country are incorporating local foods. In addition, districts from Vermont and Colorado will share how they started adding local foods to their meals and how seasonal cycle menus are now mainstays in their districts. Register here

2. Workshop: Using Gardens to Teach Summer Institute

August 23-25 // Poughkeepsie, NY
The summer institute is designed to help educators integrate gardens into their teaching. It cover topics in literacy, social studies, science, math, and nutrition, as well as build knowledge about sustainable agriculture, food systems, social justice, and ecological gardening practices. Workshop is hosted at Poughkeepsie Farm Project. Learn more and register here.


Research & Resources
1. Findings of the 2015 National Food Hub Survey
Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems has released the Findings of the 2015 National Food Hub Survey, produced in collaboration with the Wallace Center at Winrock International. This is the only study of its caliber to track nationwide data on food hubs over time. Overall, the 2015 National Food Hub Survey indicates that the food hub model can be financially successful across a variety of legal structures and geographic or customer markets. See the findings here


Jobs & Opportunities
1. Project Coordinator, Community Food Systems, The Food Trust
The Food Trust seeks a Project Coordinator to support projects related to healthy early care and education policy, farm to school and other related child nutrition programs. The coordinator will support the day-to-day management of several project focused on improving farm to early care best practices, both through policy change and through programming. Learn more here.

2. Director of Education, Stone Barns Center
Supervised by the Director of Programs, the Director of Education will manage and lead teacher and youth programs, including Mobile Kitchen Classroom, Farm Camp and other strategic educational initiatives. The Director of Education is responsible for developing and assessing strategies for achieving specific educational outcomes related to our mission. These include knowledge, skills and values related to agroecology (sustainable agriculture principles demonstrated at Stone Barns), farm-driven cuisine and making connections across the food system. Learn more here
 

Farm to school in the news
Schools make cafeteria connections - shoutout to Bertrand Weber, NFSN Advisory Board! 
School districts across the country are engaging parents with kitchen tours, smartphone apps and social media to persuade them that today’s school meals are nothing like the sometimes unhealthy foods they remember from their own childhoods. (via District Administration)

Gardening camp teaches problem-solving skills
A summer camp in Newark, N.J., offers students the opportunity to tend a school garden, feed chickens and do garden crafts. One students favorite part? "I like when we have a big root and we finally get it out after we've been working on it for so long. You get a victory." (via Newark Advocate)

Healthy Cuisine for Kids workshop touts importance of food preparation, palatability

About 30 school cafeteria managers from across Alabama are spending their summer learning from culinary experts how to best prepare and present nutritious food to students. Managers are learning new culinary techniques, recipe preparation, and the nutritional value of the food they serve. (via Times Daily)

Read past editions of This Week  for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country. 

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