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This week in farm to school: 1/27/15

NFSN Staff Tuesday, January 27, 2015

I'm happy to introduce a new weekly feature on our blog, "This week in farm to school." Every week, we will share opportunities, action items, and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 



Funding & Grants

1. New Bag the Junk Contest from National Education Association’s Health Information Network 
Calling all educators, food service and other support professionals, administrators, students, and families—NEA's Health Information Network wants to hear your Smart Snacks stories! Share your successes and challenges with healthy school foods from vending machines, cafeteria à la carte lines, school stores, and fundraisers.  Enter here for a chance at $300 and a professional video made about your school for national coverage.  Good luck and don't forget to pass on this opportunity to colleagues and students! Ask bagthejunk@neahin.org any contest questions.


Webinars & Events

1. 10th Immigrant and Minority Farmer Conference, February 7-8
Minority and immigrant farmers are invited to participate in the 10th Annual Immigrant and Minority Farmer Conference (IMFC).  The conference will be held February 7-8 at the University of Minnesota Continuing Education and Conference Center located at 1890 Buford Avenue in St. Paul, Minnesota.The IMCF focuses on the special needs and interests of immigrant and minority farmers and addresses their needs by bringing together farmers, farm advocates, educators, professionals, experts, and agency officials to one conference to exchange knowledge, network, and support. 

The conference is free to farmers.  The cost for other interested people is $60 for one day and $100 for both days.  Language interpretation is available in Spanish, Hmong, Karen, Bhutanese, and Somali. Interested in attending?  Click HERE to register today!

2. Farm to Institution Summit, April 7-9 
The Farm to Institution Summit is a first-year conference that will bring together leaders from the Northeast who are working to get more local and regional food into schools, colleges, health care and other institutions. Please join us -- and up to 800 other farm to institution advocates -- for three exciting days of learning, sharing, exploring and connecting. The Farm to Institution Summit will be held at UMass Amherst in Amherst, Massachusetts on April 7-9, 2015. Learn more at www.farmtoinstitution.org/summit.


Jobs

1. Farm to Preschool Opportunity at MSU Center for Regional Food Systems
The Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems (CRFS) is accepting applications for an Academic Specialist to support outreach and research efforts promoting good food access and awareness in childhood development and education environments. The position will support existing CRFS initiatives and help to develop additional programming capacity in this arena. For the full position description and to learn more about CRFS, visit foodsystems.msu.edu. Applications will be accepted until February 20, 2015 or until a suitable candidate is identified. 


Farm to school in the news

Tok embraces Farm-to-School with year-round greenhouse  
Gateway Greenhouse, built in 2013, is entering its first full year of growing. The goal: provide fresh vegetables to the Alaska Gateway School District, which serves about 375 students. Students get to take part, learn about cultivation and experience the joy of eating fruit and vegetables picked on the spot. (via News Miner)

Farm-to-school movement reaches the Commonwealth  
Last week, 375 interested parties met to applaud farm to school participation in local school — and discuss the challenges that still remain — at the 2015 Massachusetts Farm to Cafeteria Conference, held at the College of the Holy Cross here. The tenor of the sold-out gathering was both celebratory (“Look how far we’ve come!”) and hortatory (“Look how far we still have to go”). (via Boston Globe)

Would Kids Eat More Veggies If They Had Recess Before Lunch?  
A study just published in Preventative Medicine suggests it does. Researchers found that students who have recess before lunch tend to eat more servings of fruits and vegetables than kids who eat lunch first. (via NPR News)

Notes From the Garden: Raising the Next Generation of Gardeners  
In terms of health and longevity in this day of fast food and prepared junk food, shouldn’t we be teaching our children good eating habits as well as math? Henry Homeyer recently visited a school where all the kids love veggies and fruits — food grown right at the school. (via Valley News)



Share your story: 5 tips for building better media relationships

Stacey Malstrom Wednesday, January 14, 2015

By Stacey Malstrom, PR & Outreach Manager

Today I’m giving a presentation at the 24th annual conference of the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (SSAWG) about how to grow awareness for your farm to school program through targeted media relations. Incredible farm to school work is happening all across the country. School lunch programs are sourcing from family farms, students are working in school gardens and asking their parents to make kale salad at home, and local economies are benefiting. But does your broader community know what’s happening before the bell and beyond the classroom? 


Students in Louisiana enjoy strawberries from their garden. When you pitch to the media, make sure they know the story will have engaging visual elements, like kids in a garden. 

At its core, good media relations is about RELATIONSHIPS. Editorial staffs are shrinking, and journalists are being asked to take on more responsibilities. Their time and attention is limited; now more than ever, media need savvy sources that they can depend on. Follow these five tips to start building better media relationships and engage a wider audience in your work:

  • Stop blasting your entire media list: The quickest way to end up in someone’s junk folder is to send information that is not relevant to them or their audience. For example, a writer who only covers politics at the state capitol should not receive an event announcement for a farm field trip unless there is a policymaker attending. Narrow your media list to those contacts that you genuinely think will be interested in covering this piece of news, based on their outlet, section or personal interests. 
  • Make a connection: Media are people too, and a little attention goes a long way. Read their work, research their recent articles and follow them on twitter. Then shape your pitch for each individual. Yes, it’s a lot of work, but it will be worth it when you land that feature on the front page of your regional newspaper. 
  • Be there when they need you: You may not always hear back in response to your story ideas. Don’t get discouraged and be patient—remember how busy they are? But when they’re on deadline, responding quickly and being a resource on more than just your organization is a great way to establish trust. And before you know it, they’ll start responding to your emails and ideas more often. 
  • Send good story ideas: Not every event, report or new resource produced by your organization is media-worthy. Think about what is interesting to their readers and be selective about what you pitch. Some news is better suited for your own newsletter or social media channels. At the end of the day, it’s still the NEWs, and timely, relevant and unique stories always win.
  • Put it in context: Make it easy for media to see the story and how it connects to the bigger picture or their audience. Localize national news or trends by connecting it to your community and your work. Tell them why your program is different than others, what makes the story new now, and who else is working on similar issues. 

Join us for our next Lunch Bites webinar on Feb. 10, at 1 p.m. EST to learn more about storytelling best practices and media relations. And download the Media Tip Sheet from my SSAWG presentation here. 

Farm to school in Arizona: A conversation with Linda Rider

NFSN Staff Wednesday, January 07, 2015

Our Arizona State Lead, Cindy Gentry, recently sent us this great Q&A between Libby Boudreau, a community dietitian at the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, and Linda Rider, director of nutrition services for the Tempe Elementary School District in Arizona. Thanks to Libby for conducting the interview, to Cindy for sending it our way and to Linda for her great farm to school work! 

How long have you been doing farm to school?
I feel that I dabble in it. I first did farm to school about five years ago when we received a Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Grant from the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service, and the Arizona Department of Education gave us a big list of farmers.

What was the first item that you purchased locally?
Since 2009 we’ve purchased local apples every fall–I only want them when they’re being harvested. We expanded to include carrots from Rousseau Farms in 2011. I really want our local produce to come as much as possible from Maricopa County. Part of my initiative is to have a smaller carbon footprint and get food directly from the farms to the district. That means working with smaller farmers to support the local economy.

What other items have you been able to purchase from local farmers?
Last year I was able to bring in specialty lettuce from Duncan Family Farms through the Department of Defense Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program. It was a pilot project, and the farm was identified through Stern Produce [a local distributor]. It was only four days from harvest to door, and the lettuce was washed and chopped in between. We used it in entrée salads and side salads from November until mid-April.

What is your kitchen setup? Do you have a central processing kitchen or does each school receive and process its own deliveries?
We have a central facility and we send produce out to schools, but most of what we receive is already prepped. We don’t really have to chop and clean, but we could. As I start pulling in smaller farmers, they may not be able to get things processed. That system is still being implemented.

Did your costs increase when you implemented your farm to school program?
They stayed pretty balanced. The cost for carrots was break-even. Apples are a little more costly due to the distribution. I was getting them directly from a farmer at first, and at that time, the cost was equitable. That farmer can no longer deliver directly to the school, so they now come from a distributor called Patagonia Orchards. Because of that, the apples are a little more expensive, but they’re also organic.

What are the biggest challenges of your farm to school program?
Distribution and procurement. A distributor won’t pick up apples from a farm just for me; it doesn’t fit their model. It’s about finding out who can help with that distribution. You have to be creative to get it to come to you, unless it comes through the Department of Defense. Some of the larger distributors are highlighting local products now, and that can be a viable way to help access local farmers.

Another challenge is knowing who is out there, who the smaller farmers are. And then you have to think about food safety. Are they GHP/GAP certified, or have they had another type of third-party audit?

Finally, volume is a challenge. Our organic apples are not the only apples we serve because we don’t get enough to cover all of our needs. They’re mixed in with other apples.

What resources were useful to you as you developed your farm to school program?
There are some good procurement guides that have been very helpful. One, from USDA, is called Procuring Local Foods for Child Nutrition Programs. Another one, by School Food FOCUS, is called Geographic Preference: A primer on purchasing fresh, local food for schools

What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about farm to school programs?
That nobody wants local produce. I hear a lot of school nutrition directors talking about local, but when I call my distributor, they tell me I’m the only person asking for it. I don’t believe that. If you look at what your distributor offers and ask them about local products, there will be a shift. Schools have to tell their distributors that they are looking for local and what local means to them.

What benefits do you see from your farm to school program?
Bringing in local produce is a way to maintain nutrient density and freshness, and that’s why I like it really local – within the county. It’s just so fresh. It’s also exciting to market to the school community and help them be aware of our efforts. I know our families appreciate local, so I’m always finding ways to make them aware of what we do. It’s a customer service issue. And if we can get the teachers involved, then they get the kids excited. That’s the best way to get kids involved. Also, supporting the local economy is important. 

Tell us about your very favorite farm to school moment.
I love seeing all of the apple varieties. We’re getting Pink Lady apples in today, and they’re the perfect size for schools. We just had Fuji apples. They’re always juicy and fresh – just great apples. And they’re pretty! I think people think that if you buy organic or local, the produce is going to be ugly, but it’s not.

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