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News

This Week in Farm to School: 2/26/19

NFSN Staff Tuesday, February 26, 2019
Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 

Grants & Funding
1. Test Kitchen Grant, No Kid Hungry
Deadline: March 15
The Test Kitchen is a concept accelerator designed to help nonprofits, schools, faith organizations, and local governments turn their best ideas into validated strategies and promising practices. This year’s focus is on ending childhood hunger in the summer. Organizations selected for the first cohort will receive grants up to $10,000 and technical assistance from No Kid Hungry (NKH) to test a new model, strategy, or program designed to provide more kids with meals in the summer. Learn more and apply here

2. Native Youth and Culture Fund Grants, First Nations Development Institute 
Deadline: March 12
First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) is now accepting proposals for its Native Youth and Culture Fund (NYCF) for projects that focus on youth and incorporate culture and tradition to address social issues in Native communities. First Nations expects to award approximately 20 grants between $5,000 and $19,500 each for projects of no longer than one year in length. Learn more and apply here


Webinars & Events
1. Farm to School Resource Roundup
Wednesday, February 27, 3-4 PM ET
Join us for the first ever National Farm to School Network (NFSN) Farm to School Resource Roundup Webinar. The February webinar will feature three new resources from NFSN that aim to increase equitable access to farm to school initiatives, including the NFSN Programs and Policy Racial and Social Equity Assessment Tool; Supporting Farm to School with Non-Profit Hospital Community Benefit Dollars; and City & School District Farm to School Policy Opportunities. Register here.

2. Trending Topics Webinar: NFSN National Partner of the Year - Intertribal Agriculture Council
Thursday, March 7 // 1-2 PM ET
The National Farm to School Network (NFSN) is excited to announce the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) as NFSN’s 2019 National Partner of the Year. The IAC, a non-profit, Tribal membership organization, serving all tribal producers and communities across the country, was established in 1987 to pursue and promote conservation, development and use of Indian agricultural resources for the betterment of Indian communities. Through intentional programmatic and policy advocacy collaboration, resource sharing and cross-promotion, we aim to better connect NFSN and IAC members and continue growing farm to school in Native communities. Join this webinar to learn more about IAC and NFSN's collaboration and how members can get involved in this work. Register here.

3. Northern Nevada School Wellness Conference
Saturday, March 16 // Reno, NV
The Nevada Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Division is excited to host its second Northern Nevada School Wellness Conference in Reno on March 16, 2019 at the Truckee Meadows Community College Dandini Campus. All administrators, school wellness coordinators, teachers, food service staff and community stakeholders are encouraged to attend! Register here.


Research & Resources 
1. Slow Food Plant a Seed Kits
Slow Food believes biodiversity is key to a sustainable, adaptable — and delicious — future. The Plant a Seed campaign gives you the tools to get amazing flavor back on your plate. The Plant a Seed kit features six seed packets: three from the Ark of Taste, and three from Row 7. There is a limited number of free kits available for school gardens, request one here.


Job Opportunities
1. Education Director, Lexington Community Farm Coalition (Lexington, MA)

The Lexington Community Farm (LexFarm) is seeking an Education Director to manage education programs. The Education Director will operate, implement, and teach education programs during the 2019 farm season in accordance with LexFarm’s calendar of programs and corresponding curricula. The Education Director will manage online sign-ups, day-of set up, scheduling, and instruction of farm and garden classes for a variety of ages. The Education Director will communicate with specialty program instructors to set up and schedule specialty programs. Learn more here.

2. Program Director, Edible Schoolyard (Berkeley, CA) 
The Edible Schoolyard Project is looking for an Program Director to oversee the management of the Edible Schoolyard Berkeley. The role will develop systems, procedures and structures that enable the team to provide the highest quality instruction to our diverse students. In addition, the Program Director will provide day-to-day direction for the Kitchen and Garden Managers and play a key role in the planning and execution of educator trainings and outreach. Learn more here.


Farm to School in the News
Tennessee schools serve their own meat products
Pork produced at Central High School was served by students in every McMinn County School cafeteria on Tuesday, February 19. Specifically, 100 students from the county’s FFA chapters were present at all nine schools not only serving the locally raised and made sausage, but also educating their peers about the process. (The Daily Post-Athenian)

Kentucky students use aquaponics to “food deserts”
Students at a Kentucky middle school are maintaining an indoor aquaponics system where they can grow vegetables while learning about agriculture. The initiative is part of a student-led project to think of solutions for "food deserts" -- communities that are far from grocery stores and have limited access to fresh food. (Courier Journal)

New York school gets creative with local food in recipes
Students at a New York state school recently tasted muffins made from locally-produced beets as part of the district's farm-to-school program. School nutrition professionals prepare the local fare in creative ways, and previous recipes have included a kale apple salad, kale pesto and butternut squash macaroni-and-cheese. (27 East)

Read past editions of This Week for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country.

Farm to ECE in Family Child Care

NFSN Staff Wednesday, February 20, 2019
By Elizabeth Esparza, Communications Intern

Farm to early care and education (farm to ECE) is a group of strategies and activities that offer increased access to healthy, local foods, gardening opportunities, and food-based activities to enhance the quality of educational experience, while also expanding healthy food access and family engagement. Nearly one quarter of children spend time in family child care homes before they reach kindergarten. Because farm to ECE adapts readily to diverse settings and ages and abilities of children, farm to ECE is a great fit for family child care homes. 

In North Carolina, the Wake County Smart Start Farm to Child Care program is a collaboration of multiple organizations that work together to support child care facilities in Wake County that serve low-income families and children. The Farm to Child Care program supports ECE providers, children, and families in accessing  healthy, nutritious food. Comprised of Wake County Smart Start, Advocates for Health in Action, NC Cooperative Extension, and Shape NC, the Farm to Child Care program works together to support the almost 170 family child care home facilities in the county.

The program holds training to help child care providers better understand how to use what’s in season and to give them the skills to be able to move from canned to fresh and local food. Because family child care facilities don’t buy their food in large quantities, the Farm to Child Care program’s training focuses on diverse ways that family child care providers can obtain local foods, including directly from a local farmer and from an onsite garden. Overall, the program focuses on trainings that encourage family child care home facilities that want to focus on healthy living to make their programs holistic, incorporating the core elements of farm to ECE - local procurement, gardens, and food and nutrition education -  into multiple aspects of their program. 

In 2017, grants from the WK Kellogg Foundation brought together five organizations to form the Georgia Farm to ECE Learning Collaborative. Comprised of Georgia Organics, Quality Care for Children, Little Ones Learning Center, Voices for Georgia’s Children, and The Common Market, the collaborative partnership works to provide mini grants, free resources, materials, training, and professional development opportunities to early care providers interested in incorporating farm to ECE activities into their ECE environments, including educational activities and  meal services. 

Of the 18 Learning Collaborative sites throughout Georgia, eight are family child care homes. With support from the learning collaborative, these family child care homes create farm to ECE action plans, and receive on-site technical assistance in classrooms, training and professional development, menu consultation, and other resources to utilize in their programs. The Learning Collaborative sites are able to use the mini grants they receive to pay for books, materials, and professional development, offering them the opportunity to implement successful farm to ECE strategies into their programs.

Jackson Child Care uses their Farm to Table program to ensure that their children are ready for kindergarten, recognizing that 3-5 year olds are at the perfect age to use farm to ECE activities to align with standards. With the Creative Curriculum© as a foundation , the Farm to Table program uses farm to ECE activities to meet Virginia’s early learning standards for math, language/reading, art, and physical and cognitive development. A large part of Jackson Child Care’s program involves bringing the children out in the community and using community connections to help children learn about their food system and gain support and resources to make Farm to Table successful. Through field trips to local grocery stores and farmers markets, children are able to see and hear where their food comes from and interact with the people who grow and sell their food.

To learn more about the opportunities and benefits of farm to ECE in family child care homes, watch a recording of our February 2019 Trending Topics Webinar: Farm to Early Care and Education in Family Child Care.  Also check out USDA Team Nutrition's new version of it's popular Grow It, Try It, Like It! nutrition education materials, specifically for family child care homes. The resource has been updated and customized with posters, fruit and vegetable cards and recipes for for use by family child care homes. Download the resource here. Learn more about farm to ECE and Creative Curriculum© in Policy Equity Group’s A Guide to Using the Creative Curriculum to Support Farm to ECE Models

This Week in Farm to School: 2/19/19

NFSN Staff Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 

Webinars & Events
1. NFSN WEBINAR Farm to School Resource Roundup
Wednesday, February 27, 3-4 PM ET
Join us for the first ever National Farm to School Network (NFSN) Farm to School Resource Roundup Webinar. The February webinar will feature three new resources from NFSN that aim to increase equitable access to farm to school initiatives, including theNFSN Programs and Policy Racial and Social Equity Assessment Tool; Supporting Farm to School with Non-Profit Hospital Community Benefit Dollars; and City & School District Farm to School Policy Opportunities. Register here.

2. NFSN WEBINAR Trending Topics Webinar: NFSN National Partner of the Year - Intertribal Agriculture Council
Thursday, March 7 // 1-2 PM ET
The National Farm to School Network (NFSN) is excited to announce the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) as NFSN’s 2019 National Partner of the Year. The IAC, a non-profit, Tribal membership organization, serving all tribal producers and communities across the country, was established in 1987 to pursue and promote conservation, development and use of Indian agricultural resources for the betterment of Indian communities. Through intentional programmatic and policy advocacy collaboration, resource sharing and cross-promotion, we aim to better connect NFSN and IAC members and continue growing farm to school in Native communities. Join this webinar to learn more about IAC and NFSN's collaboration and how members can get involved in this work. Register here.


Research & Resources 
1. EQUITY 3 Hard Truths that will Help Your Organization Undo Racism, FoodCorps
"We will only get so far if we don’t explicitly and intentionally commit ourselves to undoing racism because it is the foundation upon which extreme economic disparities exist - the very disparities that explain why some children don’t have access to healthy food." Tiffany McClain, Director of Organizational Equity and Inclusion at FoodCorps, shares three steps organizations can take to undo racism and create sustained systemic change. Read more here.

2. Grow It, Try It, Like It! Fun with Fruits and Vegetables at Family Child Care, USDA Team Nutrition
Grow It, Try It, Like It! Fun with Fruits and Vegetables at Family Child Care is designed to help Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) operators provide garden-based nutrition education for children ages 3 through 5 years old in family child care settings. Through the activities in Grow It, Try It, Like It!, children touch, smell, feel, and taste new fruits and vegetables. Children also learn how fruits and vegetables grow. Planting activities help children connect the delicious food choices at the table with the farm, orchard, or garden. Read more here.

3. Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Case Study, Center for Science in the Public Interest
This case study developed by CSPI provides insights into policy strategy and advocacy best practices that resulted in passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA). The case study outlines key lessons to help inform nutrition and public health policy initiatives, as well as continued implementation and defense of school nutrition. It describes how advocates used research to develop and advocate for policy change, compromises that were needed to advance the policies, changes in attitudes about school food policy over time, framing and messaging, the role of state and local policy that laid the groundwork for national change, and how challenges were resolved between stakeholders. Read more here


Policy Updates
1. FY 2019 Funding Bill Includes $5 Million for Farm to School
The government funding bill signed by the President last week included a bright spot for the farm to school movement. Thanks to the leadership of Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), the bill included an additional $5 million in discretionary funding for the USDA Farm to School Grant Program, which doubles the annual available funding for this highly impactful and important program for one year. This is a significant win for the farm to school movement. Demand for the program is more than four times higher than available yearly funding, and this additional discretionary funding will help make the program accessible to more schools, farmers and communities across the country. Read more on our blog

2. Minnesota Lawmakers Introduce Bill to Support Farm to School
New, bipartisan legislation introduced in Minnesota last week would set aside a $2 million annual grant program to reimburse schools and early child care providers for getting food from local providers. Both schools and farmers would also get the technical assistance required to make this relationship work -- like complying with food safety ordinances, sticking to federal food guidelines, and figuring out how to prepare available veggies for elementary school kids. Read more here.


Job Opportunities
1. Program Director, Edible Schoolyard (Berkeley, CA) 
The Edible Schoolyard Project is looking for an Program Director to oversee the management of the Edible Schoolyard Berkeley. The role will develop systems, procedures and structures that enable the team to provide the highest quality instruction to our diverse students. In addition, the Program Director will provide day-to-day direction for the Kitchen and Garden Managers and play a key role in the planning and execution of educator trainings and outreach. Learn more here.

2. Grassroots Intern & Policy Intern, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (Washington, D.C.)
The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) is currently seeking a Policy Intern and a Grassroots Intern for the summer term beginning in late May 2019 and lasting until mid-August 2019. These positions are paid, full-time, and located at NSAC’s Washington, D.C. office on Capitol Hill. Learn more and apply here.

3. Better Selves Fellowship, Knoll Farm (Waitsfield, VT)
The Better Selves Fellowship is born out of the belief that the challenges facing our communities are so vast that more work, more information, faster and longer hours cannot be the only answer; what's needed is space to remember and be our better selves: clear-headed, compassionate, courageous, wise. This year we will award 60 seven-day fellowships at the Refuge at Knoll Farm. The fellowship allows time to work on a specific project that needs your focus, to write, to brainstorm solutions, or simply to get your head back on straight by walking and living on a healthy working farm. Learn more here.


Farm to School in the News
Large to small growers move crops with farm to school movement
Providence Farm is a small vegetable-and-livestock operation in Michigan, with a community supported agriculture (CSA) program and a roadside market. But owners Ryan and Andrea Romeyn say direct sales to schools have led to the “dreamy” experience of doing a profitable higher-volume business in carrots. They harvest more than 20 acres of carrots, boxing them and shipping them out. (Vegetable Growers News)

New York district honored for incorporating farm produce into kids’ meals
Southampton Union Free School District has been honored for its work to integrate local farm products into its school meal program. Both the Southampton Union Free School District and the East End Farm to School Project were recently awarded the Farm to School Partnership Award for finding and incorporating local produce into kids' meals at the Southampton, Bridgehampton and Tuckahoe school districts. (Patch)

New Jersey students enjoy salad bar with their school-grown produce 
Memorial School 7th and 8th graders who are part of the STRIVE Gifted and Talented Program on Feb. 8 enjoyed pizza and a salad bar which utilized the first cut growths off their Tower Garden, a vertical, aeroponic growing system which enables the growing of up to 20 items in less than three square feet, indoors or out, at a time. (TapInto)

Read past editions of This Week for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country.

Building Farm to School Advocacy Skills in New Mexico

NFSN Staff Monday, February 18, 2019

By Chloe Marshall, Policy Specialist

A few weeks ago, the National Farm to School Network Programs and Policy Team visited Santa Fe, NM to connect with each other and to see the amazing work of our partners in the New Mexico Farm to School Alliance.* As a humble Midwesterner, having been no further than the Mississippi river, I entered what felt like a different world when I landed in Santa Fe. It was my first time in the “Land of Enchantment.” Both Farm to Table New Mexico and the National Education Association (who served as NFSN’s 2018 National Partner of the Year) welcomed us to their annual advocacy trainings where they trained local partners on how to advocate during the state’s intense and short legislative session. Advocacy hardly sounds like an enchanting activity, but something about the passion and dedication of the folks that I met was certainly magical and the results tangible. New Mexico partners have successfully passed bills that appropriate funding for the use of NM-grown produce in school meals and establish a Food and Farms Day; advocates are currently working on passing legislation that builds on these success.

Both advocacy trainings provided a wealth of information and facilitated some exciting connections. Before we stormed the halls of the state’s capitol building (the “roundhouse” as they call it), we learned everything from the basics of engaging elected officials to the nuances of New Mexico politics. We learned the history and context of the current policy priorities, including details of past successes and failures. Facilitators from different organizations shared personal experiences and even had us role play different scenarios to prepare. We listened to the inspiring words of Mr. Regis Peco, co-director of the Leadership Institute at the Santa Fe Indian School - “There is no greater privilege than guiding the hearts and minds of children.” We collaborated and communed with local activists who taught us the vision and values of New Mexicans (and helped us test run our Racial and Social Equity Assessment Tool!) We joined a celebration of the grassroots leaders and elected officials who work tirelessly to make farm to school the norm. We even feasted at San Ildefonso Pueblo with the family of our own Alena Paisano, NFSN Program Manager, who allowed us a glimpse into indigenous culture and how it endures despite centuries of efforts to silence Native people.

In each of these experiences, I got to see the very real impact farm to school advocacy has in people’s lives. Students lined up in the roundhouse ready to advocate for themselves, empowered by the educators who made farm to school their mission. That same day, in that same building, state legislators honored farm to school champions from around the state for their dedication to the work. Farm to school is not just an idea in New Mexico, it’s a whole movement built on the belief that our children, farmers, and communities deserve better.

To learn more about farm to school in New Mexico, click here.

* New Mexico Farm to School Alliance partners:
Farm to Table New Mexico
New Mexico Public Education Department
New Mexico Health Department
University of New Mexico Community Engagement Center
New Mexico Student Nutrition Association

FY 2019 Funding Bill Includes $5 Million for Farm to School

NFSN Staff Friday, February 15, 2019


The funding bill passed by the Senate and House this week, and signed by the President on Friday, included a bright spot for the farm to school movement. Thanks to the leadership of Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), the bill includes an additional $5 million in discretionary funding for the USDA Farm to School Grant Program, which doubles the annual available funding for this highly impactful and important program for one year. This is a significant win for the farm to school movement. Demand for the program is more than four times higher than available yearly funding, and this additional discretionary funding will help make the program accessible to more schools, farmers and communities across the country. 

Please join us in thanking Sen. Leahy for this win and for helping make healthy, local food in schools a reality for millions of children across the country. You can send him a thank you on social media (@SenatorLeahy) or give his office a call at (202) 224-4242 to let him know that you appreciate his ongoing efforts to strengthen and support farm to school. Sen. Leahy championed a similar funding win in the 2018 appropriations bill. As a result, approximately $7.5 million will be awarded in FY 2019 and FY 2020 USDA Farm to School grants. 

National Farm to School Network has been advocating for an increase in funding for the USDA Farm to School Grant Program for several years. This important program increases the use of and improves access to local foods in schools – thus boosting farm income and economic opportunities – while also fostering experiential food education for our nation’s children. Since the first cycle of grants in 2013, USDA has received over 1,900 applications requesting more than $141 million, though has only been able to make 437 awards from the $30 million available. 

While the additional $5 million in discretionary funding included in the FY 2019 funding bill is a big boost for the program, this funding is temporary. It’s important that we continue to advocate for a more permanent solution for sustaining the USDA Farm to School Grant Program and its impact for communities with high-need across the country. National Farm to School Network continues our advocacy work to ensure that farm to school opportunities are accessible to every student, farmer and community across the country. Stay tuned to our blog for more policy news, updates and opportunities to join us in this advocacy and make your voice heard. 

This Week in Farm to School: 2/12/19

NFSN Staff Tuesday, February 12, 2019
Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 

Survey: Help Shape the Future of Farm to School
The National Farm to School Network is looking toward its goals for the future – and we want your input! Please take a few moments to complete our member survey to provide us with your perspective about the National Farm to School Network and your ideas about our future work. The results from this survey will inform plans our next strategic plan and future National Farm to School Network activities. Take the survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JRVJVXR The survey closes March 1. If you have any questions or technical issues with the survey, please contact our Evaluation Consultant, Amy Paxton Aiken at aepaxton@gmail.com.

Webinars & Events
1. NFSN WEBINAR Farm to School Resource Roundup
Wednesday, February 27, 3-4 PM ET
Join us for the first ever National Farm to School Network (NFSN) Farm to School Resource Roundup Webinar. The February webinar will feature three new resources from NFSN that aim to increase equitable access to farm to school initiatives, including theNFSN Programs and Policy Racial and Social Equity Assessment Tool; Supporting Farm to School with Non-Profit Hospital Community Benefit Dollars; and City & School District Farm to School Policy Opportunities. Register here.

2. NFSN WEBINAR Trending Topics Webinar: NFSN National Partner of the Year - Intertribal Agriculture Council
Thursday, March 7 // 1-2 PM ET
The National Farm to School Network (NFSN) is excited to announce the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) as NFSN’s 2019 National Partner of the Year. The IAC, a non-profit, Tribal membership organization, serving all tribal producers and communities across the country, was established in 1987 to pursue and promote conservation, development and use of Indian agricultural resources for the betterment of Indian communities. Through intentional programmatic and policy advocacy collaboration, resource sharing and cross-promotion, we aim to better connect NFSN and IAC members and continue growing farm to school in Native communities. Join this webinar to learn more about IAC and NFSN's collaboration and how members can get involved in this work. Register here.

3. Life Lab's 2019 School Garden Workshops
Santa Cruz, CA
In Life Lab's Garden Classroom on the UC Santa Cruz campus, professional trainers bring inspiration and information to educators interested in bringing learning to life in the garden. Workshops are available on a variety of garden / outdoor learning topics and will be hosted throughout 2019. Learn more and register here.

4. New Hampshire Food System State-Wide Gathering
March 12 // Plymouth, NH
The 4th Annual NH Food System Statewide Gathering will bring together 200+ individuals, organizations, businesses, and institutions working to strengthen our local food system. Our focus this year will be on "Cultivating our Collective Voice" and harnessing the power of our connections and relationships to shape local and state food policy. Through engaging workshops and dialogue, we'll explore how we can best collaborate and advocate to support our farms, fisheries, and food businesses, who in turn, sustain healthy communities and our vibrant working landscapes. Register here.

5. Virginia Farm to School Conference
March 14 // Hampton, VA
The Farm to School Conference is designed to help Virginia’s expanding Farm to School Network increase procurement of local foods and educational opportunities in school gardens, cafeterias, classrooms, early care centers and summer feeding programs across the commonwealth. Register here.

6. EQUITY Racial Equity Habit-Building Challenge
April 1-21  
Food Solutions New England invites you to join for the fifth year of the Challenge! Participants from across New England and the rest of the country will be taking part in this year's effort which will include updated daily prompts, a new launch webinar featuring Dr. Eddie Moore, a Discussion Guide for groups and much more. Sign up here.

Research & Resources 
1. EQUITY Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems: Racial Equity in the Food System ListServ 
Michigan State University's Center for Regional Food Systems just launched a national Racial Equity ListServ - EQUITYFOOD - to complement its Racial Equity in the Food System workgroup. Connect with your colleagues around building racial equity within the food system, and access resources like an annotated bibliography on structural racism, webinars, and various tools and articles. Learn more here

2. American Traditional Foods In USDA School Meals Program - Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
The American Indian Traditional Foods In USDA School Meals Programs: A Wisconsin Farm to School Toolkit is a new resource to help source, menu, credit, and use more traditional foods in school meal programs. The Toolkit features native and traditional foods to include in school means, new recipes for schools use, menu planning support, and procurement information. Read more here.

3. EQUITY Food and Farm Reading List for Black History Month
For Black History Month, Rafter Ferguson, Scientist, Food and Environment, at the Union for Concerned Scientists is sharing a reading list of books that can help deepen our understanding of the history and contributions of Black farmers in our food system. Explore the reading list here
 

Job Opportunities
1. Senior Associate, Community Food Systems, The Food Trust (Philadelphia, PA)
The Food Trust is seeking an enthusiastic, creative, organized and committed leader to oversee the planning, development and implementation of The Food Trust’s Community Food Systems program including multiple statewide policy and regional food systems initiatives. Learn more here

2. Garden Projects Champion AmeriCorps Vista, North Coast Opportunities (Ukiah, CA)
The Gardens Project of North Coast Opportunities seeks to relieve hunger and inadequate nutrition throughout Mendocino and Lake Counties by creating access to community-based food  production and local, nutritious food. Much of their current work focuses on supporting existing gardens and gardeners through leadership training, food production workshops, advocacy and organizational support. To apply, send a resume and cover letter to avaryan@ncoinc.org.

3. Farm to School Coordinator, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County (Ithaca, NY) 
In collaboration with school food service staff, regional farms and distributors, food, nutrition, garden and agriculture educators and Cornell’s Master of Public Health program, the Farm to School Coordinator will be responsible for developing, implementing, and improving a coordinated and sustainable procurement plan to increase the amount of local produce served in Tompkins County’s school cafeterias. Learn more and apply here.

4. CoFED Racial Justice Fellowship
CoFED’s Racial Justice Fellowship is a 6-month opportunity for young cooperators (ages 18-30) of color working to close the racial wealth gap by advancing community ownership of land and the food system. They're looking to support emerging leaders who can demonstrate a solid and progressive track record of creating change - and who are ready to take their vision, leadership and impact to the next level. The fellowship includes a $5,000 stipend, leadership coaching, trainings and networking opportunities. Applications open Feb. 15 and are due by March 15, 2019. Learn more here.

 
Farm to School in the News
Nebraska high-schoolers sell produce to school cafeteria
Students who are part of the local chapter of the National FFA Organization at a Nebraska high school are learning about sustainable agricultural production by working in an on-campus greenhouse. The students plant and harvest produce in vertical towers that is sold to the school's cafeteria. (The Grand Island Independent)

University of Georgia’s ‘Grow It Know It’ program expanded
An award-winning interactive Clarke County school program that teaches students about science and nutrition is now underway in Barrow County, thanks to the University of Georgia. The “Grow It Know It” program, established in 2013 by the UGA Office of Service-Learning, UGA Cooperative Extension, UGArden and the Clarke County School District, is designed to support teachers involved in farm-to-school programming. (Albany Herald)

Healthy Foods for Healthy Kids program grows vegetables at Delaware schools
A program designed to get kids to eat more vegetables has made inroads at area schools. The organization's mission is to design and implement food-and-garden-based school program, partnering with schools in Delaware to start vegetable garden programs on-site during the academic day that align with the science curriculum, and also enable students to try delicious vegetables. (WDEL)

Read past editions of This Week for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country.

This Week in Farm to School: 2/5/19

NFSN Staff Tuesday, February 05, 2019
Every week, we share opportunities, action items and a selection of media stories that relate to the farm to school movement. To submit an item for consideration, send us an email. To be considered, content should be of national interest to the farm to school community. 

Grants & Funding
1. 2019 Gro More Grassroots Grant 
Deadline: February 15, 2019
In 2019, The Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation and KidsGardening will award 175 grants worth a collective total of $100,000. 150 grant recipients will be awarded a check for $500 to support their initiatives. The top 25 programs will receive a check for $1,000. The Gro More Grassroots Grant is open to all nonprofit and tax exempt organizations (including schools) in the United States and US Territories planning to use the funds to install new or expand existing youth focused gardens or greenspaces. Learn more and apply here.


Webinars & Events
1. NFSN WEBINAR Trending Topics in Farm to ECE: Farm to Early Care and Education in Family Child Care
Thursday, February 7, 1-2 PM ET
Across the country, there are over 213,000 licensed family child care homes and nearly one quarter of all children spend time in family child care before they reach kindergarten. Farm to early care and education (farm to ECE) – including local food procurement, gardening, and food and agriculture education – is a great fit for family child care. Farm to ECE adapts to diverse ages, abilities, and settings and offers evidenced-based approaches to meeting educational and nutrition standards. Join this National Farm to School Network webinar to learn about new resources to support farm to ECE in family child care, hear about best practices from county level farm to ECE initiatives, and see examples of farm to ECE in family child care success. Register here.

2. NFSN WEBINAR Farm to School Resource Roundup
Wednesday, February 27, 3-4 PM ET
Join us for the first ever National Farm to School Network (NFSN) Farm to School Resource Roundup Webinar. The February webinar will feature three new resources from NFSN that aim to increase equitable access to farm to school initiatives, including theNFSN Programs and Policy Racial and Social Equity Assessment Tool; Supporting Farm to School with Non-Profit Hospital Community Benefit Dollars; and City & School District Farm to School Policy Opportunities. Register here.

3. Vermont Farm to School & Early Childhood Day
Wednesday, February 6, 9:30 AM - 6 PM
Join us at the State House to celebrate and raise awareness of Farm to School and Early Childhood in Vermont. Activities and celebration range from a joint House and Senate Agriculture Committee hearing, school lunch served in the cafeteria, time to connect with legislators, and time to hear farm to school stories, displays, and networking. Learn more here


Research & Resources 
1. Online Course: Teaching Food & Nutrition for All
Teaching about food & nutrition can seem complicated, but it doesn’t have to! The Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy is launching a NEW online course this summer, from July 8-26. The course is intended to be for current educators or individuals interested in teaching nutrition in the school setting, to give you the tools & confidence to bring this topic to life in your classroom. Register before March 1 for a discount. Learn more here

2. EQUITY Equity Imperative Declaration - Novato Unified School District 
Here's a great example of how a school district in California is sharing our its commitment to equity. Equity in Novato Unified School District means ensuring every student has access to educational opportunities that challenge, inspire and prepare him or her for a strong future. The purpose of the Equity Imperative Declaration is to publicly explain why equity is important, to outline NUSD’s universal and targeted goals, and to state NUSD’s commitment to the actions necessary to achieve its goals. Read NUSD's Equity Imperative Declaration here.

3. EQUITY 7 Meaningful Ways to Celebrate Black History Month
February is Black History Month, a dedicated time to pay attention to the power and resilience of the black community. This celebration is reminder to seek out stories and histories that often go overlooked — and it also serves as a call to recognize the various black leaders in our own lives. This article by Katie Dupere offers ideas for honoring black lives and culture this Black History Month.


Job Opportunities
1. Outreach and Education Coordinator, Arcadia Food, Inc. (Alexandria, VA)
The Outreach and Education Coordinator will develop and provide garden and nutrition educational programming for youth, adults, and senior citizens; support Arcadia’s Field Trip and Farm Camp programs; strengthen Arcadia’s connection to schools and community partners in the surrounding community; support efforts to build garden and nutrition education capacity in schools; and support efforts to link health providers and food access organizations in the County. Learn more here.

2. Food Hub Program Associate, Field to Family (Iowa City, IA)
Field to Family is hiring a Food Hub Program Associate to connect more schools, hospitals and retirement communities with local farmers and producers. The Food Hub Program Associate will assist the Food Hub Manager in the general operations of the Field to Family Food Hub to create a more local, healthy and sustainable food system. Learn more here.


Farm to School in the News
Georgia student chefs compete in farm to school contest
Middle-school students in Georgia are competing in the preliminary round of the Georgia Department of Education's Farm to School Student Chef Competition. Students will taste-test and judge vegetable side dishes and the winner will submit the recipe -- along with its nutritional analysis -- to the statewide competition, where the judges will be school nutrition professionals. (Union Recorder)

Oregon Junior-Senior High School produces own beef, eggs, produce for student body
Students at Lost River Junior-Senior High School know where their food comes from: they eat beef from their own steers, eggs from their chickens and tomatoes from their greenhouse. (Herald and News)

Sunny Baker selected as WKKF Community Leadership Network Fellow
The Center for Creative Leadership and W.K. Kellogg Foundation have announced Class Two of the WKKF Community Leadership Network, a model program for developing local leaders who can unite people to create transformational change toward a more equitable society for all. Congratulations to Sunny Baker, co-director of the Mississippi Farm to School Network and NFSN Mississippi Core Partner, for being selected as a fellow in the Mississippi cohort! Read more here.
 
Read past editions of This Week for more funding opportunities, webinars and events, jobs, and ways to take action to support farm to school growth across the country.

Welcome, Chloe Marshall!

NFSN Staff Monday, February 04, 2019
National Farm to School Network is excited to welcome Chloe Marshall to our team as our Policy Specialist! 

Chloe brings a wealth of advocacy, coalition building, and food equity experience to our team. Before joining the National Farm to School Network, she served as the Maryland Advocacy & Outreach Coordinator with Capital Area Food Bank in Washington, D.C, where she represented the food bank on policy and budget issues locally and on Capitol Hill. In addition, she has served on the Prince George’s County Food Equity Council (FEC),  where she leveraged her work with the Food Bank and the FEC into a partnership to launch a food justice coalition in Capitol Heights, MD, and founded the Food Justice Coalition of 20743, a collaboration of residents, community organizations, and grassroots leaders who seek community-led solutions to local food equity issues. Chloe is a graduate of Johnson & Wales University with a degree in Culinary Nutrition. Her strong passion for community engagement and unique background in food policy make Chloe an exciting addition to our team. 

Chloe currently resides in Prince George’s County, Maryland, where she enjoys singing with her church’s choir, the Suitland Road Chorus, and tending to her aging cat, Mabel Anne. 

Chloe is based in our Washington, D.C. office. Reach out to her with your policy questions, to brainstorm solutions to policy challenges, to share you successes or to find out how you can get involved in advocating for policy change. Send her a message or say hello at chloe@farmtoschool.org.
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