Bringing the Farm to School:
Producer Resources

This information is intended for agricultural producers who participate in Bringing the Farm to School: Local Producer Trainings. The goal of the Bringing the Farm to School program is to provide agricultural producers training and tools to build your capacity to launch or grow efforts to market to schools. Below are several key resources and links to additional information intended to supplement the Bringing the Farm to School: Local Producer Training.

Bringing the Farm to School was developed in partnership by USDA Food and Nutrition Services, the National Center for Appropriate Technology, and the National Farm to School Network.

Producer Workbook

Bringing the Farm to School: Agricultural Producers Toolkit

This workbook for the Bringing the Farm to School: Agricultural Producers' Toolkit is intended to be used by producers who participate in the Bringing the Farm to School: Local Producer Training. The information, activities and resources in this workbook directly correlate with the full Agricultural Producers' Toolkit curriculum that is offered through the Local Producer Training. Each module in this workbook covers a different aspect of selling local food products to schools.

Download a copy of the School Business Action Planning Guide
Download a copy of the Producer Workbook Worksheets

Case Studies

Bringing the Farm to School: Agricultural Producers Toolkit

Throughout the Bringing the Farm to School: Agricultural Producers' Toolkit training you will find case studies (in written, video, and podcast format) that highlight how farmers have applied key concepts on their own farms or business operations. These case studies offer real-world examples of the concepts taught in the Local Producer Training lesson plans.

Additional Producer Resources

Click below to check out additional resources and materials to support producers in selling their products to schools below.

Have Questions?

Send us a note at info@farmtoschool.org.

This project has been funded in part by federal funds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service through an agreement with the National Center for Appropriate Technology in partnership with the National Farm to School Network. The contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government.